The Kombucha Craze; What you Need to Know – Custom Collagen

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The Kombucha Craze; What you Need to Know

 

Kombucha generally refers to tea that has been fermented with bacteria and yeast. Lately, the health world and millennial community has been in a craze surrounding kombucha, claiming that it is good for the human body. Flavored kombucha drinks have become health store staples with claims that the drink can help with everything from diabetes to cancer. So, how much of the hype is real and what do you really need to know about kombucha?

According to Mayo Clinic, much of the fad surrounding kombucha is probably a little overly optimistic but there are a few benefits. Although claims that drinking kombucha could help you avoid cancer are probably untrue, kombucha does work as a valuable probiotic. Probiotics like kombucha help regulate the digestive system which can help with digestive issues as well as inflammation. Kombucha might also aid your immune system. Aside from that, however, it is probably not a cure-all.

There could also be some draw-backs to kombucha. Kombucha has caused some people to experience allergic reactions or digestive problems. On top of that, it is probably best to purchase pre-made kombucha drinks rather than making them at home because fermenting the tea yourself could lead to some bacterial problems if the process isn’t done properly. The taste of kombucha drinks also puts some people off.

Collagen could serve as a substitute if you decide kombucha isn’t right for you. Traditional Tonic Nourishing Collagen does help your body support natural processes, including your digestive system. Traditional Tonic goes even farther by also improving your hair, skin and nails. Plus, the flavorless powder can be mixed into any beverage of your choice, so taste is never an issue. And, importantly, Traditional Tonic is safe and natural and should not cause any negative side effects. If you’re unsure about kombucha but you want some of its benefits, try Traditional Tonic instead.

 

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/expert-answers/kombucha-tea/faq-20058126